Home Forums Find Survivors 0-6 Months Can expressive aphasia improve over time? I’m asking for my brother, he is 17 years old and he had his stroke on the 21st of August, the stroke affected his right side and the opposite side of his brain. so he can’t speak he uses gestures to respond and his right side is not working.

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #40488
    Nyiko Baloyi
    Participant

    I want to find out if expressive aphasia can improve over time.

  • Author
    Replies
    • Strokefocus Admin
      Participant

      Nyiko, understood. I could not imagine the level of stress the family is
      experiencing now. Tell us more about him before stroke.

    • Carol Legg
      Participant

      Dear Nyiko

      I am a speech therapist in Cape Town and work with people with aphasia, both young and old, most days.
      Your brother will continue to show improvement, especially now, but also from month to month and year to year. He will regain some speech, how much speech is the unknown but there is always improvement.
      If there are any speech therapy services in the area where you stay, this will help.
      Counting, singing, reading aloud will help too. Show him your mouth movements for words that he can copy. Have a notebook with lists of your names and places and needs for easy reference. Write things down for him (key words) so he can point to options.
      Continue to include him in all conversations and social activities and advocate to others that aphasia is a difficulty speaking and not a difficulty thinking. The most important is that he continues to feel connected to others and still gets to laugh and have happy social times together that don’t need speech (like watching soccer).

      I am most happy to answer any questions you have about aphasia.

      • Nyiko Baloyi
        Participant

        We are really worried about his schooling he is in grade 11 and never went to school since this happened. I’d there any hope that he will ever go back to school?

    • Anne Tillinghast
      Keymaster

      August is not very long ago! If possible, now is the time to work hard. Hopefully he has a speech therapist. Some survivors can sing, even if they cannot speak, so singing, or singing along to favorite recorded songs can be very helpful in helping the brain recover some speech. Remember that recovery continues to be possible in the following months and years.

      • Nyiko Baloyi
        Participant

        This is encouraging..

    • Strokefocus Admin
      Participant

      We have seen people getting much better over the time. Everyone is different but do not lose hope.

    • David Huntington
      Participant

      Nyiko, We have seen people recovering over time on their aphasia. The recovery is slow but surely possible. Be patient.

    • Phanuel Mabbola
      Keymaster

      it can depending on the extent of the damage on the nerves, I saw two stroke survivors here in Zambia I have been attending to who had serious problems with speach but with time and some speach therapy they are improving. encourage choose the best diet which will help with the building of the nerves system, music also is good if they can be singing alongside as it plays.

      • Nyiko Baloyi
        Participant

        what kind of food assists with the building of the nerves?

Viewing 5 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.